If you're coming to Denmark, welcome to the land of the Vikings. Denmark is more than just the once Viking full Jutland Peninsula, but also some 400 islands including the Faroe Islands encompassing some 43,000 square kilometers.

In tribute to Denmark's Viking roots, it is only right to see the Alborg Viking Site first. This is one huge Viking burial ground, but it's also got a Christian Cathedral and Monastery.

And just outside the capital city of Copenhagen is the Viking Ship Museum, whose highlight is the five Viking ships saved from the ravages of the sea.

As proud as the Danes are of their Viking heritage, it is a modern country too. Copenhagen is alive with jazz concerts, beer gardens, and Opera, Ballet, and theater performances.

It is also alive with all sorts of outdoor recreational fun, like golfing and fishing, and the sport of kayak polo. Denmark is fun in that it has its own Legoland, open from April to October, too.

The most popular time to come to Denmark is between June and August. Winters can be harsh with days that don't see much sunshine; although the Faroe Islands do experience warmer winter weather. The price they pay for it is days that are almost always cloudy.

Cheer yourself up during the winter with a visit to Denmark's Carlsberg Brewery, with Visitors Center, of course. It is the most famous of Danish beer.

Beer is good, but so is a Danish breakfast, it's a hearty fare full of rolls, jam, cheese, and bread. And Scandinavian coffee is also hearty, usually drank black. The schnapps, called Akvavit, will keep you warm on a cold winter day.

Keep eating and drinking, without any health concerns in that department you can pretty much eat and drink whatever you want. Go crazy on the koldt bord, a self-serve buffet of meats, fish, cheese, and desserts.

After a good warm-up (and fill up), time to head to Elsinore to see Kronborg Castle, a place of great importance from the 16th to 18th centuries. And used as the setting for a Shakespearian tale.

No trip to Denmark is every truly finished until you've been to Odense, the birthplace of the most famous Dane of all, Hans Christian Andersen.

Shopping is a delightful activity as any, and the famous Royal Copenhagen porcelain is made right here. In the Faroe Island all sorts of woolen items are made to keep you warm on a cold Scandinavian night.

What's great about Denmark is how easy it is to get around. Domestic flights are available, the roads are good, ferries are found all over the place, and bike lanes abound. You can even take the bikes on the buses, ferries, and trains.

All you need is a passport (or a simple European Union ID card), as most nationals don't even need a visa. You should always double check if you're going to need an ongoing ticket before arriving. You wouldn't want to be chased out by the Vikings now, would you?